1 August 2005

Feedback—Your FAQs Answered

Why Is There No GI for Blueberries, Blackberries, and Raspberries?
Janey Berry, a spokesman for Waitrose reports that the UK’s ‘craze’ for the GI diet has boosted sales of berries, porridge and bananas, as people seem to have reposed their faith in the new diet rather than Atkins. Waitrose UK recorded a 264 per cent rise in demand for blackberries, while sales of breakfast oats rose 80 per cent. 'The GI diet has definitely had an impact on sales of berries, but there has been a return to old-fashioned fruit we had when we were kids,' she said.

However, what you really need to know is that apart from strawberries (GI 40), most berries actually have so little carbohydrate it’s difficult to test their GI. Their low carbohydrate content means their glycemic load will be low, so you really can enjoy them by the bowlful. They are a good source of vitamin C and fibre and some berries also supply small amounts of folate and essential minerals such as potassium, iron, calcium, magnesium and phosphorus. Eat them fresh, add them to fruit salads and frappés, use them in a delicious dessert, decorate cakes with them, or make them into jams, fruit spreads and sauces.

As for fresh strawberries, they are rich in vitamin C, potassium, folate, fibre and protective anti-oxidants. Because the average serve has very little impact on blood glucose levels, people with diabetes can eat them freely. So reap the health benefits as you enjoy them by the bowlful, but hold the cream! A word of warning: don’t eat too many strawberries in a single day. They can have diuretic and laxative effects if you overdo it.

From Low GI Eating Made Easy. Available in Australia and New Zealand (Hachette Livre); UK: December 2005 (Hodder Mobius); USA: January 2006 (Marlowe & Company)

I Have Type 2 Diabetes. How Can I Feed a Big Family with Cost-effective, No-hassle Low GI Foods?
Feeding a big family on a budget can be hard. But low GI eating often means making a move back to the inexpensive, filling and healthy staple foods that our parents and grandparents enjoyed. This includes traditional oats for breakfast porridge, legumes such as beans, chickpeas and lentils (available in cans), cereal grains like barley, and of course plenty of fresh vegetables and fruit, which naturally have a low GI. Some of these foods may take a little more time to prepare than high GI processed, packaged, and pricey ‘convenience’ foods piled high on supermarket shelves, but the savings will be considerable and the health benefits immeasurable. For a list of the top 100 low GI foods, check out Low GI Eating Made Easy. This book also includes plenty of ideas for using these foods in everyday meals. Or take the Diabetes Australia Healthy Shopping Tour (www.diabetesnsw.com.au). Your diabetes dietitian or educator will also have plenty of ideas for low-cost, low GI meals that the whole family will enjoy.

11 comments:

liz said...

I have been using barley couscous which is fairly fine in texture. Am I right to assume this is likely to be towards the higher GI values shown in your piece on barley?

Joy Renzulli said...

hello my name is Joy (61yrs)and I'm checking you out from the USA, state of New Jersey...your site is very interesting and I might say helpful towards the GI...my husband Ralph (76yrs)is type 2 diabetic, takes all kinds of pills and the insulin (2x's a day), I work he's retired, AND is not very physicaly active. He hurts,and then does'nt move because he hurts, so THEN he hurts more because of it, needless to say I'm VERY upset, that he's not active. many arguments have started because of it, too.My chiropractor got us hooked on GI and I'm trying. Hopefully by reading and checking out the GI we could loose our excess weight----thanks for being there...Joy (P S I'm not familiar with the term -blogger-???)

Anonymous said...

Congratulations on the Newsletter. I found it very informative and usefull. I believe this newsletter is the missing link in communicating,educating and keeping memebers abreast of current developments in The Glycemic Index.

I also loved your Monthly recipes butI would dearly like to see a number of recipes for making multi grain bread or rolls with low GI values. I have been unsuccessfull in finding one.

If anyone out there has any recipes for these please feel free to email them to cas_win@yahoo.com.au

"What on earth is a Blogger?" and what will I be signing for if I openind a Blogger account?

CAS

Anonymous said...

A 'blog' is a shortened version of the term 'weblog.' So a blogger is essentially someone who logs something on the web, be that their personal daily diary, or research they might be involved in. Hope that helps.

gi group said...

We are looking into posting some homemade recipes for a low GI bread. Stay tuned for the September newsletter.

Gi group

Anonymous said...

I do not have Diabetes, but I do have Hipoglycemia and I feel very bad if I don't have a good breakfast,what works wonders for me, is a baked potato and an orange juice. Am I on the right track for my glucose levels?

GI Group said...

There are no published results for barley couscous. However it is a nutritious food and ideal for people needing a gluten-free diet. As with couscous made from wheat and other carb-rich cereal grains with a moderate to low GI, we would say enjoy but be sensible about the portion you put on your plate. These foods have the potential to have a high glycemic load if you pile your plate high or go back for seconds ...

Anonymous said...

The response from the GI Group re my request for Multi Grain Bread recipes last month was "Stay tuned for the September newsletter". I really did stay tuned for the September Newsletter but ........ where are the promised recipes????????

Anonymous said...

How long does it take your insulin level to return to normal after consuming a tablespoon of sugar or honey, or eating a chocolate bar?

Anonymous said...

How long does it take your insulin level to return to normal after consuming a tablespoon of sugar or honey, or eating a chocolate bar?

Anonymous said...

I just bought my first book on the GI Revolution and found your site.

My head is spinning with all the new ways I should be eating to lose weight before I get a serious illness.

One question, how do I figure the GI of processed food? US labels everything but the GI right now.